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Last Updated Feb 12, 2011 by

GMAT Tips: Strategic Guessing on the GMAT

Today’s GMAT tip comes from Kaplan. In this article, Kaplan GMAT instructor Bret Ruber provides advice on how to guess strategically on quantitative problems: Almost every GMAT quantitative problem can be solved in more than one way.  Some of the various approaches to GMAT math questions include picking numbers, backsolving and doing the straightforward algebra.  But you will encounter some GMAT problems that you are unable to solve.  Because the GMAT is a computer adaptive test, this does not necessarily mean you are doing poorly.  It just means that you will be faced with a problem on which you will... Read more »

Last Updated Feb 9, 2011 by

GMAT Tip: GMATPrep Q&A – Correct Verb Tense on Sentence Correction

Today’s GMAT Tip comes from our friends at Knewton.  In this post, they share advice on how to pick up on errors in verb tense.  Read on to see what they have to say! In preparation for the sentence correction portion of the GMAT, let’s go over a great question asked by one our students, Mike, about an especially deceptive GMATPrep® SC problem. Mike’s question is about the proper use of the past perfect tense, which you’ll recall is used to indicate that one past event occurred before another past event. Try the question, then read on to see where... Read more »

Last Updated Feb 5, 2011 by

GMAT Tip: Breaking Down a GMATPrep Consecutive Integer Problem

Today’s GMAT tip comes from test prep firm ManhattanGMAT. In this article, they share helpful tips on how to solve consecutive integer problems.  Read on to see what they have to say! This week, we’re going to talk about what to know for consecutive integer problems and how to recognize what to do on future problems of the same type. This one is from GMATPrep®. Set your timer for 2 minutes…. and… GO! * ” If n is a positive integer and r is the remainder when n2 – 1 is divided by 8, what is the value of r?... Read more »

Last Updated Feb 2, 2011 by

GMAT Tip: Common GMAT Traps – The Ellipsis

Today’s GMAT Tip comes from our friends at Knewton.  In this post, they share advice on how to identify when elliptical construction is being used incorrectly.  Read on to see what they have to say! The term ellipsis, or elliptical construction, describes the omission of words in order to make a sentence more concise. Ellipses are used frequently with comparisons. An ellipsis may eliminate a subsequent occurrence of a word or words stated previously in a sentence only when the word or words are exactly the same each time they appear. No ellipsis: During the 17th century, Britain experienced some types... Read more »

Last Updated Jan 29, 2011 by

GMAT Tip: Solve This Stats Problem, Stat!

Today’s GMAT challenge question comes from Veritas Prep. To help you with your GMAT studying, try to solve the problem on your own, and then read on for the explanation of its solution: Set A consists of integers -9, 8, 3, 10, and J; Set B consists of integers -2, 5, 0, 7, -6, and T. If R is the median of Set A and W is the mode of set B, and R^W is a factor of 34, what is the value of T if J is negative? (A) -2 (B) 0 (C) 1 (D) 2 (E) 5 This... Read more »

Last Updated Jan 27, 2011 by

Admissions Director Q&A: MIT Sloan’s Rod Garcia

We circled back recently to check in with an admissions director we hadn’t yet reconnected with as part of our Admissions Director Q&A Series – Rod Garcia of the MIT Sloan School of Management. Maybe it’s all the snow in Boston that gave him a little extra free time to take part. Whatever the case, we’re happy to have had a chance to catch up with him and think you’ll enjoy the interview that follows. An MIT Sloan veteran, Garcia has been at the school for the past 23 years and admissions director for the last 12. Before coming to... Read more »

Last Updated Jan 26, 2011 by

GMAT Tip: Choosing the Best Answer on Sentence Correction

Today’s GMAT Tip comes from our friends at Knewton.  In this post, they share advice on how to identify the best answer for sentence correction questions.  Read on to see what they have to say! This GMATPrep® Sentence Correction question was sent to us by a student who got stuck between two choices and couldn’t decide which was right. It is a perfect example of the fact that the GMAT asks you to choose the best version of the sentence from among the five choices given, not the best possible version. Let’s take a look: Regarded by opponents as ineffective... Read more »

Last Updated Jan 22, 2011 by

GMAT Tip: Exponent Manipulation – Tough questions, basic approaches

Today’s GMAT tip comes from Kaplan. In this article, Kaplan GMAT instructor Bret Ruber explains how to tackle tricky quantitative problems involving exponents: Exponents questions are common among advanced quantitative problems and generally fall into two categories, both of which involve a variable in the exponent. First are problems that ask test-takers to solve for an unknown in the exponent.  For example, the GMAT could tell you that 3x+1 = 272x-4, and ask you to solve for x.  The key strategy for a question such as this one is to set the bases equal to each other.  In this case,... Read more »

Last Updated Jan 19, 2011 by

GMAT Tip: How to Use Formal Logic on the GMAT Critical Reasoning Section

Today’s GMAT Tip comes from our friends at Knewton.  In this post, they give helpful advice on how to use formal logic on the Critical Reasoning section of the GMAT.  Read on to see what they have to say! GMAT Critical Reasoning questions test your ability to use logic. In most cases this means making inferences, identifying details, and understanding arguments. Occasionally, however, you will have to apply formal logic to understand what a CR paragraph implies. Formal, or, classical logic, has its own set of rules, and questions that make use of it will try to trip you up... Read more »

Last Updated Jan 15, 2011 by

GMAT Tip: Divisibility Mother Lode

Today’s GMAT challenge question comes from ManhattanGMAT.  To help you with your GMAT studying, try to solve the problem on your own, and then read on for the explanation of its solution: Problem If m is the square of integer n and m is divisible by 98, m must also be divisible by: I.   28 II.  196 III. 343 A) I only B) II only C) I & II only D) II & III only E) I, II, and III Solution First, break 98 into primes.  98 = 49 × 2 = 7 × 7 × 2.  The “ingredients” of... Read more »

Last Updated Jan 12, 2011 by

GMAT Tip: How to study for the GMAT in 2 weeks

Today’s GMAT Tip comes from our friends at Knewton.  In today’s post, they outline how best to study for the GMAT in two weeks.  Read on to see what they have to say! Let me begin with a disclaimer: Try not to do do this! Seriously. Prepping for the GMAT in two weeks is, to put it mildly, a less than ideal approach. You won’t have time to cover every topic comprehensively, nor will you be able to master as many new concepts and test-taking strategies as you would in a month or longer. That said, sometimes circumstances require a... Read more »

Last Updated Jan 6, 2011 by

GMAT Tip: GMAT Math Strategy – Think with your pen

Today’s GMAT Tip comes from our friends at Knewton.  In this post, they provide helpful hints on how to tackle particularly complex math problems.  Read on to see what they have to say! Here is a rather challenging GMAT math problem. Give it a shot: For every positive EVEN integer n, the function h(n) is defined to be the product of all the even integers from 2 to n, inclusive. If p is the smallest prime factor of h(100) + 1, then p is (A) between 2 and 10 (B) between 10 and 20 (C) between 20 and 30 (D)... Read more »

Last Updated Jan 1, 2011 by

GMAT Tip: Jump to Conclusions

Today’s GMAT tip comes from Veritas Prep.  In today’s article, they provide helpful tips on how to identify the conclusion of a Critical Reasoning argument. Read on to see what they have to say! We all know that a Jump-to-Conclusions mat is a horrible, horrible idea as a mainstream consumer product.  As a GMAT strategy, though?  Used properly, a Jump-To-Conclusions Mindset can be a valuable asset to you on Critical Reasoning problems.  Problems often ask you to strengthen a conclusion, weaken a conclusion, or determine an assumption necessary for the conclusion to hold true. In any of these cases, it... Read more »

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